Author: Head Honcho
May 2008

Ah yes another piece for which I must write a disclaimer!  To whit: “my opinions here in no way reflect those of anyone else on staff, or, indeed, on Earth.  Also, they don’t reflect Debra’s, yet she is still kind enough to print them.  Cheers.” Did anyone else catch that article in the New York

May
2008
May 2008

Amanda adapted a recipe from a package of Sea Tangle kelp noodles, and her rendition is below.  She says, “This lively and delicious salad will surprise everyone when you tell them the ‘noodles’ are actually mineral-packed sea kelp!  Jazzed up with sesame oil and lemon, this dish tickles and brightens the palate and satisfies a

May
2008
May 2008

I suppose the icy depths of winter would be a more appropriate time to cover herbs that are heating and spicy.  But now is when the mood strikes, so, here goes. Actually, summer might not be such a bad time for this, after all.  Traditional South American, Asian, and Indian cultures don’t back off the

May
2008
Apr 2008

Recently, I started making my mother’s corn crisps again.  This recipe, which appears in our first cookbook now called If Kallimos Had a Chef, is even more fun and delicious with the addition of hemp.  Why hemp seeds?  Because they are a nutritional powerhouse with easy-to-digest protein and lots of fiber.  Hemp is also an

Apr
2008
Mar 2008

Chickpeas, aka garbanzo beans, originate in the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Today, everyone everywhere eats them.  Why is that, aside from the fact they taste good?  Well, they’re high in soluble fiber, which helps lower cholesterol and decreases insulin requirements for people with diabetes.  They contain protein, calcium and iron (isn’t that a surprise?) 

Mar
2008
Feb 2008

A satisfying, simple vegetarian stew served over whole grains.  Of course you can add tempeh, tofu, shrimp, chicken, lamb, beef or chickpeas.   Millet is one of those under-utilized grains that is alkalizing, easy on the digestive system, somewhat foreign to us, but “friendly” when combined with something we already know and love like rice.   Too

Feb
2008
Feb 2008

So I talked about food last month, and tried to dispel some of the myths about what you should and should not eat.  This month, I’d like to recommend five ways to use supplements to reduce cholesterol.  As always, I like to start with the ones that are the most holistic, that have the most

Feb
2008
Jan 2008

Soups are perfect for those with allergies because they can easily be made without wheat, soy, dairy, eggs, or other foods that are so difficult for many.  And soups are comfort food when it’s dark outside.  Here’s another soup from me to you this January 2008.  May 2008 bring you and yours health and happiness!

Jan
2008
Jan 2008

I’ve been putting off writing this one for years.  First of all, it’s an enormous topic: you can reduce cholesterol levels by decreasing absorption, increasing excretion, reducing the rate at which it is reabsorbed once it’s been excreted, by preventing it from sticking to blood vessel walls, or by reducing the production of cholesterol in

Jan
2008
Dec 2007

Which she made for me with the following note:  “To one fearless leader from one leerless feeder.” What is cocoa butter?  The natural fat of the cacao bean (from which we get the incredible stuff known as “chocolate”).  Do we sell it?  But of course.  Cocoa butter has a melting point just below average body

Dec
2007
Dec 2007

This is a repeat of one of my (it’s Debra again!) favorite desserts (to complement just about anything).  No mess in the kitchen, and nutrient rich.  And what a concept — a dessert that keeps those you care about healthy!   We all know dried fruits like apricots, peaches and prunes have lots of fiber, which

Dec
2007
Dec 2007

We have more than an entire shelf’s worth of brain supplements at the store, and all sorts of stuff on other shelves, too, that people take to be smarter.  And most of them, frankly, won’t do much for you at least not if you’re basically okay to begin with.  It’s only when you head off

Dec
2007
Nov 2007

Wild rice is expensive, but is special and perfect for holidays like Thanksgiving or Chanukah (which starts December 4th this year).  Wild rice is not a grain like other rices, but a seed.  Go figure!  Just like buckwheat is not a grain, but a fruit….  Wild rice kernels are unpolished (so you get every drop

Nov
2007
Nov 2007

This is an article on weight loss.  I last covered the topic for the May, 2001 newsletter.  Yet just recently, it has recently been called to my attention that the first article did not entirely solve the problem… That first one was called “It’s May Already, and I’m Still Too Fat For My Bathing Suit!” 

Nov
2007
Oct 2007

It must be fall because the new apple crop is in!  Apples are winners when it comes to reducing the risk of heart disease, says a new study of more than 34,000 women. The findings, published in the March, 2007 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, noted apples are a rich source of flavonoids and fiber

Oct
2007
Oct 2007

A study published just last month in The Lancet, England’s most respected medical journal, has confirmed that artificial food colorings and preservatives make children hyperactive. Many of you saw this, I’m sure.  It was front page news. However it hardly came as a surprise to anyone who has followed the issue over the last 34

Oct
2007
Sep 2007

Asiago is an Italian company, and we’re pleased as punch to carry their frozen, mixed porcini, oyster, shiitake and nameko mushrooms.  Adam introduced this product to me, and we both love how easy it is to make dinner by just adding a few other ingredients! Mushrooms lack chlorophyll, which means they don’t produce food for

Sep
2007
Sep 2007

Coenzyme Q10 is a chemical naturally found in every cell of our bodies.  Indeed, its name in older biochemistry texts, ubiquinone, reflects the fact that it’s so very ubiquitous.  CoQ10 is needed for the generation of energy inside our cells[1].  And obviously, energy is essential to normal functioning of the body.  We don’t blink an

Sep
2007
Aug 2007

I fell in love with Kurt’s recipe back in the summer of 2002. Kurt is baking bread at the Orchard Hill Breadworks in VT.  He swings by from time to time bearing the gift of whole grain loaves baked the old-fashioned way.  Kurt writes, “One time Adam asked the Gaia Herb rep what the best

Aug
2007
Aug 2007

In the world of vitamins and minerals, herbs and oils, green foods and high-tech antioxidants, superfruit juices are a relatively new development.  But in the last decade really, in the last few years they’ve leapt into the mainstream with a vengeance.  Noni was first, after a woman got on the Oprah show and swore that

Aug
2007
Jul 2007

A meal in itself with some ripe summer tomatoes.  I’d add olives and those little pickling cucumbers too.  Organic chicken on the grill….. Or Steady Lane Farm hamburgers or steaks…. Seven Oaks Ranch, the maker of Garlic Gold products, is nestled in the Ojai Valley.  The Ranch grows and distributes organic produce such as tomatoes,

Jul
2007
Jul 2007

I keep trying to figure out ways to use hemp and pumpkin seeds because they’re both so healthy, but hemp sounds “sexier”, so it’s in the title here.  I read that hemp is the “next flax” because it’s another rich, rich source of essential fatty acids.  Ruth Shamai of Ruth’s Hemp Foods says, “So that’s

Jul
2007
Jul 2007

Inflammation: Imbalances in the immune system cause MS, when rogue immune cells infiltrate parts of the nervous system and attack.  The weapon used in this attack is inflammation.  You can reduce this inflammation by rebalancing the immune system (see part 1), or by addressing the inflammation directly.  Or, of course, by doing both. Most people

Jul
2007
Jun 2007

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is a progressive, inflammatory disease that attacks the central nervous system: the brain and spinal cord.  Specifically, MS degrades the myelin sheath, the fatty insulating layer which encases our nerve fibers, and which facilitates speedy and coordinated transmission along neural pathways.  As you can imagine, when these transmissions get messed up,

Jun
2007
Jun 2007

Herbes de Provence originated in southern France, and includes herbs found in the region: rosemary, basil, marjoram, thyme, sage, savory, tarragon, bay, fennel and lavender. We have two different mixes in our store, one by Frontier Herbs and Spices, and a second lovely version made by Jean Louis of A Touch of Provence, located right

Jun
2007
Jun 2007

by Debra Stark For years I’ve heard people talking about dry eyes.  I never understood the problem until one morning (yes, it seemed to happen overnight), I woke up, rubbed my eyes, and the eyes went into spasms.  It felt as if grains of sand were stuck there.  My eyes streamed and my nose ran

Jun
2007
May 2007

In May, I feel in transition mode, not wanting heavy, cooked wintry dishes, but not ready yet for summer corn or salads made from ripe tomatoes.  This easy salad, which can be a meal, suits my fancy in spring. Did you know that chard actually came from the Mediterranean and Asia Minor?  That while it

May
2007
May 2007

We all want to eat, and live, organically.  But we don’t not always.  Even the best of us cuts corners every once in a while. Bearing this in mind, various scientist and activist groups have taken to publishing top-10 lists, ranking the worst foods for pesticide residues.  The higher the levels of pesticide residues on

May
2007
Apr 2007

Research published just last month now strongly links a variety of genetically-engineered corn to liver and kidney damage in rats, as well as elevated triglycerides, and changes in weight between the sexes.  The particular variety of corn, Monsanto’s MON863 is approved for human consumption in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, China, Japan, Canada, Mexico,

Apr
2007
Apr 2007

Mother Earth Magazine lists kale as one of the “Thirty-Three Greatest Foods for Healthy Living.”   Grown in Europe since 600 B.C.E., kale was the most common green vegetable, and in Scotland, kale in one dialect meant food, and the expression “to be off one’s kail” meant to feel too ill to eat.

Apr
2007
Apr 2007

Contrary to popular belief, bacteria aren’t all bad.  In fact, there are all sorts of bacteria which live on us, and in us, and actually do us a world of good.  The majority live in our digestive tracts, where they help us digest food, excrete toxins, and keep our immune systems up and running.  These

Apr
2007
Mar 2007

Perfect for days that are still cold and often blustery.  We often are able to get peeled, diced organic butternut squash on organic produce day, which makes this dish a five-minute snap to prepare for the oven!  Of course you can halve, peel and cube your own squash, or substitute diced yams. Vegetarian?  Substitute any

Mar
2007
Mar 2007

This is an article about skin.  Not “problem skin,” but skin that glows with health, and ages well.  It’s about thick, luxuriant hair, and strong teeth. The idea here is that our outsides reflect our insides.  Lynne Lori Sullivan, who works with this and other health topics, says she has very sensitive skin and likes

Mar
2007
Feb 2007

(The breakthrough getting the most press these days is vitamin D3, but we covered that over a year ago.  Archives on this and other cutting edge natural treatments for osteoporosis such as strontium and vitamin K2, plus bone basics, can all be found in our newsletter archives).  A study published last October in the American

Feb
2007
Jan 2007

It’s interesting to follow the research on “up-and-coming” supplements as it develops over a number of years.  You start with one or two intriguing (but inconclusive) test tube studies, watch it move on to a few small animal trials, then wait for the big human trials that will either prove or disprove all the hope,

Jan
2007
Dec 2006

In the more than five years I’ve been writing this column, I’ve covered topics ranging everywhere from allergies and weight loss, to hepatitis and cancer.  And I’ve been flattered that so many people have read what I’ve written, and taken it seriously.  Nevertheless, I’ve always wanted to write a column on how to find information

Dec
2006
Nov 2006

Actually, fiber is for a lot of things.  That title was just to get your attention. Of all the changes we have wreaked on traditional diets over the last hundred years, our drastic reduction in fiber intake might very well be the most significant[1].  Not only have we turned away from fiber-rich plant foods, but

Nov
2006
Oct 2006

I just counted: we have 104  different multivitamins.  This guide should help you make sense of them all.     Tablet or Capsule, etc.?  First of all, this is not a quality issue.  Claims that liquids absorb better, or that tablets “go right through you,” etc., are mostly nonsense. The only issues here are personal preference

Oct
2006
Oct 2006

I recently had a chance to sit down with our nurse, Grace, and discuss foods for diabetics.  In addition to working here, Grace is also the Type II Diabetes Educator at the Mass Research Diabetes Center in Waltham, and a type II diabetic herself.   She always tests her blood sugar after trying a new food.

Oct
2006
Sep 2006

Part I covered lifestyle and diet (including culinary herbs like garlic and stevia).  This month: supplements. There are literally dozens if not hundreds of supplements that can help with blood pressure.  This won’t be an exhaustive list!   Please bear in mind, some of the strongest herbs for reducing hypertension, such as Indian snakeroot and foxglove,

Sep
2006
Aug 2006

The higher our blood pressure, the harder the heart has to work.  Over time, this enlarges the heart, which is not a good thing.  Chronic high blood pressure hardens the arteries and increases our risk of heart attack, aneurysm, and stroke.  The kidneys, which filter the blood, can also be damaged.  The risk of glaucoma

Aug
2006
Jul 2006

 (and now you’re going to be thrilled you can eat!) CHOCOLATE: You’ve probably have heard the snippets on the nightly news: “Chocolate may reduce the risk of heart disease.”  “Chocolate protects against cancer.”  “Chocolate reduces the appearance of wrinkles.”  Which would seemingly be our cue to start eating some.  But there’s always something in the

Jul
2006
Jun 2006

A few months ago, I started an article on the liver.  I basically spent about two-thirds of a page trying to convince everyone how great of an organ the liver is, and how we should take care of it even when we don’t have any specific problems, then said “to be continued…”  Well, here’s the

Jun
2006
Jun 2006

Satisfying trail mix. Try it, you’ll like it! And, of course, the variations are endless. Yes, it’s a little spicy (you can make it to suit your taste buds), but remember that cayenne pepper increases circulation. Nuts like pistachios as part of a balanced diet can lower blood pressure in folks with hypertension. Lots of

Jun
2006
May 2006

by Debra Stark In Jack Challem’s book, Feed Your Genes Right, Mr. Challem says nutrition feeds our genes, which not only are found in every one of our 70 trillion cells, but which contain the basic biological instructions for everything from eye color to the risk of heart disease and other disorders.   “Instructions, encoded

May
2006
May 2006

The saffron crocus (Crocus sativus) is a rare purple flower that grows in Iran, Greece, Spain, Morocco, and parts of India.  As many as 75,000 flowers – a football field’s worth of intensive cultivation – are needed to produce a single pound of saffron, which must be harvested by hand! Saffron is the most precious,

May
2006
May 2006

When you stop and think about it, all the stuff that goes on to keep us alive is pretty amazing.  And I’m not even talking about the wonder of reproduction or the miracle of consciousness, but about the everyday nitty-gritty that keeps things running.  The heart pumps (and we don’t notice), the lungs inhale and

May
2006
Apr 2006

(and Migraines and Urinary Incontinence and Maybe Some Other Stuff Too) Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) has the largest leaves of any plant native to England, as much as three feet across. In olden times, people used to wrap butter in them.

Apr
2006
Feb 2006

87% less colic, 50% less booze, 27% more breast cancer, 60% less ovarian cancer, 56% fewer colds (that get better 35% faster); and why spicy olive oil is better. 56% Fewer Colds: Every now and again, researchers decide to mix up some ginseng with human immune cells in a test tube, and see what happens.

Feb
2006
Jan 2006

The day we finally bought our space and became masters of our own destiny, it occurred to me: we have 68 different kinds of lip balm. The day before, when everything was still up in the air, it occurred to me: this place feels like home. On that day, a customer came up to me

Jan
2006
Dec 2005

We make vitamin D in our skin using a type of solar radiation called ultraviolet B (UVB). Unfortunately, UVB is filtered out by the atmosphere. As the Earth tilts on its axis in winter, the sun’s rays travel through more atmosphere to get to us, and more and more UVB is filtered out. Some estimates

Dec
2005
Nov 2005

If I had written this article on vitamin D just a few years ago, I would have struggled to fill a single page. I might have said a little about D and osteoporosis, and mentioned the importance of sunlight, and then that would have been that. But the last few years have seen an explosion

Nov
2005
Nov 2005

A lot of people are panicked about the avian flu, so I want to make one thing very clear to start out with: a pandemic is not inevitable. In fact, as things stand right now, it seems unlikely. As far as we know, avian flu has jumped the species barrier from bird to human only

Nov
2005
Oct 2005

Okay, so the title is a little misleading. Most of this article is going to discuss fish oils, which we’ve known about for a few years already. The rest is going to touch on the Mimosa tree, which the Chinese have been using for a few millenia, but which I just learned about… Anyways, they’re

Oct
2005
Sep 2005

Cataracts, Macular Degeneration, & Diabetic Retinopathy Cataracts: In the front of the eye is a lens, like the lens on a camera: it focuses light images so they can be sent to the brain. Cataracts are “spots” or “stains” in the lens. Vision loss depends on the size, shape, color, and location of the cataracts.

Sep
2005
Aug 2005

About two years ago, I was asked to speak to Peg Morse’s[1] Vision Group at the Newbury Court retirement home. It turned out to be the worst talk I ever gave. Don’t get me wrong – I’ve always enjoyed speaking with Peg. And the other people who came were also nice, attentive, and engaged. For

Aug
2005
Jul 2005

I’m dating an herbalist now, and she’s pretty amazing. (She’s also going to be reading this). Her training, her philosophy is all about herbs, straight from Nature, prepared the way our ancestors prepared them. I, on the other hand – I love the herbs, too; don’t get me wrong – but I also think nutraceuticals

Jul
2005
Jun 2005

The holistic approach to dealing with intense stress isn’t to survive it but to remove yourself from it whenever possible. But sometimes, no matter how calm and in-touch-with-nature you are, two or three weeks just come out of nowhere and hit you like a ton of bricks – you’re dealing with sleep deprivation, overwork, physical

Jun
2005
Apr 2005

Last month’s newsletter talked a bit about anxiety and panic, touching briefly on the differences between the two.  It also included a fair amount of talk about “lifestyle” factors – those indirect but very real contributors to anxiety and panic.  Much of the article was drawn from an interview with Janet Beaty, a local naturopathic

Apr
2005
Mar 2005

Anxiety, simply put, is worrying.  And we’ve all done that!  Anxiety disorders, however, are when we worry for no good reason, or the worrying doesn’t go away, or takes over our lives.  Anxiety-related disorders are the most common psychological diagnoses in this country, outstripping even depression. 

Mar
2005
Feb 2005

(The list of natural medicine treatments for insomnia could easily number into the hundreds, and that’s not an exaggeration!  This short little two-page article is going to be far from an exhaustive survey!) Before we even get into the pills and powders, I should point out a paper published in the January, 2003 issue of

Feb
2005
Jan 2005

A few months ago, a controversial paper was published in a generally reputable medical journal[1], which seemingly condemned vitamin E as not only useless, but potentially dangerous.  This paper is at odds with the hundreds of other papers that have been published in hundreds of other medical journals, which seemingly confirm that vitamin E is

Jan
2005
Dec 2004

There are 101 ways to approach winter wellness, and 1001 products you can use.  It’s enough to make your head spin!  I’m going to try and simplify things here, and present a relatively straightforward program.  In short, I’m going to tell you what I do when I’m trying to stay well.  But before I begin,

Dec
2004
Nov 2004

(With a special note about antibiotics) When I first sat down to write this, I was just going to talk about my 5-point herbal wellness plan, and how important it is now with the flu vaccine shortage. But then I figured I ought to write about stress… which meant writing about adaptogens… then a couple

Nov
2004
Oct 2004

By Carolyn Soderstro Confused about essential fatty acids (EFA’s)? It’s pretty hard not to be because much of the information out there is inaccurate, incomplete or wrapped around an advertisement for a particular product. Here are the basics together with answers to some of the more common questions we’ve been asked. Why do we need essential fatty

Oct
2004
Sep 2004

When people come into the store and ask, “What’s good for energy?” 101 possibilities come to mind.  There are so many herbs and superfoods, high-potency vitamins and state-of-the-art supplements to choose from.  Well, I love all that stuff, I really do.  But before you move on to the ginsengs and Coenzyme Q10s of the world,

Sep
2004
Aug 2004

In the early 1930’s a dentist named Weston Price traveled to Switzerland to disprove a theory. At the time, most people believed that tooth decay and other dental problems had nothing to do with diet, but rather, with “race mixing.” The theory was, if your mom was Spanish and your dad was Irish, you’re teeth

Aug
2004
Jul 2004

Organic: Most of us have a rough idea what organic means: grown without synthetic pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizers, on land that has been clean for at least three years. No sewage sludge as fertilizer, no genetically modified organisms (GMOs: see below). Food must not be irradiated. For animal products, no anti-biotics or synthetic hormones, and

Jul
2004
Jun 2004

For bumps, bruises, burns, bites, sprains, broken bones, and getting trampled by an elephant. Heat or Ice? At least once a summer I jam a finger playing basketball. Within minutes, the finger turns a sickly purple-red and swells up to twice its normal size, and then I can’t move it for a week. Or at

Jun
2004
May 2004

Treatment Target #5 – Oxidation: Chemotherapy and radiation kill cancer cells; the problem is, they also kill the healthy cells of the body. Antioxidants protect the healthy cells of the body from chemo and radiation; the problem is, they may also protect the cancer cells… As you can imagine, then, using antioxidants alongside conventional therapies

May
2004
Apr 2004

Cancer is the taboo topic in health food stores. Sure, we’re always eager to talk about prevention, but when it comes to treatment, we shy away from concrete statements. We do this because, while many of us have considerable knowledge about the herbs and vitamins in question, we rarely have an in-depth understanding of the

Apr
2004
Mar 2004

Ever since we hosted Mary Bove’s talk about the thyroid in January, people have been coming in saying how sorry they were to have missed it ? and do we have something like lecture notes from the talk? Unfortunately, we don’t. Although I can’t cram into two pages what Mary Bove covered in an hour-and-a-half,

Mar
2004
Feb 2004

Another month, another topic, and yet another opportunity to write about fish oils. Truly nothing in natural or conventional medicine (with the exception of exercise, stress reduction, and a balanced, whole foods diet) is as effective in preventing and treating so many conditions! While there is, for any given condition, something that works better for

Feb
2004
Jan 2004

Many women experience what they call a Premenstrual Syndrome, or PMS. For a few days before their period, they may become angry, moody, irritable, tired, and/or depressed. Some women report water retention and bloating, breast pain or tenderness, headache, digestive problems, and/or food cravings. These symptoms last a few days to a week before their

Jan
2004
Nov 2003

Over the past few years, a group of doctors, supplement manufacturers, and concerned citizens have been waging a legal battle against the U.S. Food & Drug Administration which will ultimately determine our freedom to receive accurate, scientific information about our health. Although the specific court case concerns using an herb for prostate enlargement, it has

Nov
2003
Oct 2003

I promised I’d talk about the use of antacids and acid blockers for reflux and ulcers as “one of the top-ten health misconceptions” in this country today. So here goes. Acid reflux is properly called Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease, or GERD. In GERD, acid escapes out of the stomach and into the esophagus, the tube which

Oct
2003
Sep 2003

After more than two years of writing these health columns for the newsletter, I’m finally going to have a little fun, get a little preachy, and offend some people. I can’t wait to get started! But before I do, the following disclaimer: these are my opinions, and do not necessarily reflect the beliefs of anyone

Sep
2003
Jul 2003

While osteoarthritis (OA) is a simple matter of wear-and-tear on the joints, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a little more complicated. In RA, the immune system gets involved. It may be oversimplifying things to simply say the immune system “attacks” your joints. But basically, that’s what’s happening.

Jul
2003
May 2003

Osteoarthritis (OA) is pretty simple. Basically, there’s wear-and-tear on our joints, which is balanced by certain maintenance processes. As long as maintenance can keep up with the wear-and-tear, we’re fine. But as we get older, maintenance slows down while wear-and-tear doesn’t. So the joint starts to erode. This is when OA starts. Younger people can

May
2003
Mar 2003

A few months ago, when I wrote the newsletter article on osteoporosis, I barely touched on vitamin K. All I said was: “You need it to move calcium around your body. If you eat a good serving of green vegetables a day, you’ve pretty much got it covered. Some people do benefit from taking extra.”

Mar
2003
Feb 2003

“Just as a large police force is needed in a locality where crime occurs frequently, so cholesterol is needed in a poorly nourished body to protect the individual from a tendency to heart diseases… Blaming coronary heart disease on cholesterol is like blaming the police for murder and theft in a high crime area.” -Sally

Feb
2003
Jan 2003

Plus: EFA’s against osteoporosis, PMS The newsletter two months ago covered some basics of fats and oils. Last month covered the omega-3 essential fatty acids (EFA’s), found in fish and flax oil (among other places), and how they combat inflammation and help prevent some of our most devastating degenerative diseases. Finally, I’m going to wrap

Jan
2003
Dec 2002

How they help cure almost everything – really! People say omega-3’s are good for the skin. People say omega-3’s are good for the heart. People say they’re good for arthritis, colitis, osteoporosis, brain function, allergies, eczema, and asthma, too. And you know what? People are right. If I had to make a list of the

Dec
2002
Nov 2002

Part I: the basics, plus oils for cooking When you hear about fats and oils in the news, it always seems like the focus is on avoiding them. Advertising trumpets “low fat” this and “fat free” that. Now, many of us are beginning to understand that not all fats are bad for us. (Our store

Nov
2002
Oct 2002

About a year ago, I went hiking with my friend, Paul Gorman. Normally when I go hiking, I’m the one who has to slow down so that people can keep up with me. But Paul is such an incredibly strong hiker, I quickly found myself struggling to keep up with him. I was out of

Oct
2002
Sep 2002

The herb St. John’s Wort (Hypericum Perforatum) is a safe and effective antidepressant with a long tradition of use, backed now by strong research. It has few side effects, if any. But before I get into the research, let me quote my favorite herbalist, Michael Moore, from his Medicinal Plants of the Pacific Northwest: (He

Sep
2002
Aug 2002

Part I reminded us walking in fresh air, sharing food with friends simple pleasures help stave off depression, and that a balanced, whole foods diet is essential to maintaining good mental health.  The book, Natural Prozac by Joel Robertson and Tom Monte, does a wonderful job explaining the role of food in controlling depression.  We

Aug
2002
Jul 2002

As the joke goes, a man visits his doctor. “Doc,” he says, “I’m feeling kind of blue.” “Tell me more,” says the doctor. “Well,” says the man, “just this week I got fired from my job, I found out my wife was cheating on me, my 15-year-old flunked out of school and started selling drugs,

Jul
2002
Jun 2002

Acne is one of those things that doesn’t really hurt and probably won’t kill you, but it can still make your life pretty miserable. But there are some things you can do about it. And you don’t have to be a teenager either. If you look closely at your skin, you’ll see thousands upon thousands

Jun
2002
Jun 2002

Sugar in foods is dangerous for a number of reasons. First of all, it feeds Candida yeast. As many of us are beginning to learn, the human gut is home to billions and billions of bacteria and yeasts, some good and some bad. Candida is a normal part of the gut flora, and as long

Jun
2002
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