Paleo Apple Chocolate Fudgies

Paleo means “prehistoric” or “primitive,” and now there’s the Paleo Diet, sometimes called the Primal Diet or Caveman Diet. The idea is, everything you eat has to be made from something a caveman or cavewoman could’ve eaten. So fruits and veggies, nuts and seeds, fish and meat, honey and olives and herbs and spices, are all fine. But beans and grains, which have to be processed and prepared, are off limits. Dairy is off limits, too, because it comes from a domesticated animal. (You can't really milk something wild…) And of course partially hydrogenated soybean oil and Red dye #5 are strictly verboten.

Of course no true caveman or cavewoman gathered around the cave fire, eating a "fudgie" made in a food processor with cacao from Africa, apples from Kazakhstan, and maple syrup from Vermont!

Paleo Apple Chocolate Fudgies

Paleo means “prehistoric” or “primitive,” and now there’s the Paleo Diet, sometimes called the Primal Diet or Caveman Diet. The idea is, everything you eat has to be made from something a caveman or cavewoman could’ve eaten. So fruits and veggies, nuts and seeds, fish and meat, honey and olives and herbs and spices, are all fine. But beans and grains, which have to be processed and prepared, are off limits. Dairy is off limits, too, because it comes from a domesticated animal. (You can't really milk something wild…) And of course partially hydrogenated soybean oil and Red dye #5 are strictly verboten.

Of course no true caveman or cavewoman gathered around the cave fire, eating a "fudgie" made in a food processor with cacao from Africa, apples from Kazakhstan, and maple syrup from Vermont!

Ten Reasons to Choose Non-GMO

What are GMOs? Genetic Modification (GM) is when genes from one specie of bacteria, viruses, insects, animals or even humans, are forced into the DNA of another specie. GM crops share two main factors: they’re engineered to survive application of weed killers and their altered genes produce poisons to kill bugs. An example: Monsanto’s Round-Up Ready soy beans.

Since GM soy came on the market in 1997, allergies to soy have risen 50%. There are scientists who state things like 1/3 of ladybugs who ate aphids who fed on GM potatoes became sterile and many more of them died.

Where does the Research Stand? Random Questions, Inconclusive Answers… Plus: Unsubstantiated Opinions!

High Fructose Corn Syrup, Vitamin C, Dr. Oz, and more!

How bad is high-fructose corn-syrup? Is plain sugar that much better? When we’re talking about long-term health, we really want to see long-term trials. We want to follow identical people with identical diets, whose only difference is what kind of sweetener they consume. But those trials don’t exist. Who would pay for them? Who would sign up for them? Who would stick to them? And would they even be ethical?

So right now, the evidence is based on blood work and epidemiological observations. Blood work is great, but in the end, it’s all circumstantial, and can only hint at long-term, real world outcomes. Epidemiological research is great too, but it’s also limited. No matter how hard we try, we’ll never really have two “identical” groups, with only one difference. In this case, maybe the people who consume a lot of HFCS also eat less vegetables, or consume more caffeine; or consume the exact same number of calories… only more of them in liquid form; or they cook less at home, and it turns out the act of cooking itself is somehow valuable.

Get Some Sleep!

A good night’s sleep is absolutely foundational to good health.  The research is there (although yes, it’s hard to separate cause from effect on this one) that insufficient sleep is linked to slower and fuzzier thinking, a weakened immune system, anxiety and depression, weight gain, heart attacks, and fatal car crashes.  Not to mention wrinkles! 

Yet so many of us sleep so poorly, or simply don’t sleep enough.

How much is enough?  Obviously, people vary.  But in 1910, before light bulbs and radios in every home, before computers and television, Americans reported sleeping over nine hours a night.  Even today, people living away from these distractions – scientists above the Arctic Circle in winter, lab subjects without windows and clocks – tend to average between 8.5-10.5 hours of sleep a night.