Year: 2006
Dec 2006

In the more than five years I’ve been writing this column, I’ve covered topics ranging everywhere from allergies and weight loss, to hepatitis and cancer.  And I’ve been flattered that so many people have read what I’ve written, and taken it seriously.  Nevertheless, I’ve always wanted to write a column on how to find information

Dec
2006
Nov 2006

Actually, fiber is for a lot of things.  That title was just to get your attention. Of all the changes we have wreaked on traditional diets over the last hundred years, our drastic reduction in fiber intake might very well be the most significant[1].  Not only have we turned away from fiber-rich plant foods, but

Nov
2006
Oct 2006

I just counted: we have 104  different multivitamins.  This guide should help you make sense of them all.     Tablet or Capsule, etc.?  First of all, this is not a quality issue.  Claims that liquids absorb better, or that tablets “go right through you,” etc., are mostly nonsense. The only issues here are personal preference

Oct
2006
Oct 2006

I recently had a chance to sit down with our nurse, Grace, and discuss foods for diabetics.  In addition to working here, Grace is also the Type II Diabetes Educator at the Mass Research Diabetes Center in Waltham, and a type II diabetic herself.   She always tests her blood sugar after trying a new food.

Oct
2006
Sep 2006

Part I covered lifestyle and diet (including culinary herbs like garlic and stevia).  This month: supplements. There are literally dozens if not hundreds of supplements that can help with blood pressure.  This won’t be an exhaustive list!   Please bear in mind, some of the strongest herbs for reducing hypertension, such as Indian snakeroot and foxglove,

Sep
2006
Aug 2006

The higher our blood pressure, the harder the heart has to work.  Over time, this enlarges the heart, which is not a good thing.  Chronic high blood pressure hardens the arteries and increases our risk of heart attack, aneurysm, and stroke.  The kidneys, which filter the blood, can also be damaged.  The risk of glaucoma

Aug
2006
Jul 2006

 (and now you’re going to be thrilled you can eat!) CHOCOLATE: You’ve probably have heard the snippets on the nightly news: “Chocolate may reduce the risk of heart disease.”  “Chocolate protects against cancer.”  “Chocolate reduces the appearance of wrinkles.”  Which would seemingly be our cue to start eating some.  But there’s always something in the

Jul
2006
Jun 2006

A few months ago, I started an article on the liver.  I basically spent about two-thirds of a page trying to convince everyone how great of an organ the liver is, and how we should take care of it even when we don’t have any specific problems, then said “to be continued…”  Well, here’s the

Jun
2006
Jun 2006

Satisfying trail mix. Try it, you’ll like it! And, of course, the variations are endless. Yes, it’s a little spicy (you can make it to suit your taste buds), but remember that cayenne pepper increases circulation. Nuts like pistachios as part of a balanced diet can lower blood pressure in folks with hypertension. Lots of

Jun
2006
May 2006

by Debra Stark In Jack Challem’s book, Feed Your Genes Right, Mr. Challem says nutrition feeds our genes, which not only are found in every one of our 70 trillion cells, but which contain the basic biological instructions for everything from eye color to the risk of heart disease and other disorders.   “Instructions, encoded

May
2006
May 2006

The saffron crocus (Crocus sativus) is a rare purple flower that grows in Iran, Greece, Spain, Morocco, and parts of India.  As many as 75,000 flowers – a football field’s worth of intensive cultivation – are needed to produce a single pound of saffron, which must be harvested by hand! Saffron is the most precious,

May
2006
May 2006

When you stop and think about it, all the stuff that goes on to keep us alive is pretty amazing.  And I’m not even talking about the wonder of reproduction or the miracle of consciousness, but about the everyday nitty-gritty that keeps things running.  The heart pumps (and we don’t notice), the lungs inhale and

May
2006
Apr 2006

(and Migraines and Urinary Incontinence and Maybe Some Other Stuff Too) Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) has the largest leaves of any plant native to England, as much as three feet across. In olden times, people used to wrap butter in them.

Apr
2006
Feb 2006

87% less colic, 50% less booze, 27% more breast cancer, 60% less ovarian cancer, 56% fewer colds (that get better 35% faster); and why spicy olive oil is better. 56% Fewer Colds: Every now and again, researchers decide to mix up some ginseng with human immune cells in a test tube, and see what happens.

Feb
2006
Jan 2006

The day we finally bought our space and became masters of our own destiny, it occurred to me: we have 68 different kinds of lip balm. The day before, when everything was still up in the air, it occurred to me: this place feels like home. On that day, a customer came up to me

Jan
2006